Newsletter 105

Local Veg (Organically Grown, Lantau Island, HK)

Sweet potato $20 per kg

Choi sum $20/350 g

Pak Choi $20/350g

Mustard leaves $15/350 g

Sweet potato leaves $10 bunch -recipe http://www.motherearthnews.com/relish/sweet-potato-leaves-recipe-zb0z11zwar.aspx

Water spinach $15 bunch

Rocket $20 for 200 gms

Baby silk gourd, like courgettes – $30 kg

Eggplant $25 for 350 gms

Okra $15 for 200 gms
Herbs $15 bundle (chives, dill, basil, oregano, mint, lemon balm)

Kaffir lime leaves $10 for five leaves

Chillies $5 bundle

Fresh Ginger

Ginger seedling $30

Curry Leaf tree seedling $10-30 depending on size

 Bhola can deliver in the Mui Wo area or meet you at the ferry pier for a drop-off if you live along the coast. Phone Bhola at 54222844, or visit the farm in Luk Tei Tong.

Alternative News:

Oil – this looks at oil supply from an angle not normally dealt with, namely exports. Exporting countries need more and more of their own oil, giving rise to some alarming predictions for importing countries:

http://www.energybulletin.net/stories/2012-09-23/global-oil-exports-decline-2006-what-will-importing-nations-do

and this looks at the energy investment needed to transition to renewable energy. It doesn’t emphasise enough that we’re going to be living with drastically reduced amounts of energy available:

http://www.energybulletin.net/stories/2012-09-30/energy-transition-we-need-do-it-fast-and-were-way-behind

Europe – shock doctrine tactics to centralise power in Europe. Goodbye democracy:

http://theautomaticearth.com/Finance/youre-dreaming-if-you-think-the-euro-crisis-is-resolved.html

Coral – collapse of coral reefs continues:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/oct/01/great-barrier-reef-coral-cover

Bus – be cool, go by bus:

http://www.copenhagenize.com/2012/09/worlds-coolest-bus-commercial.html

Bees – thanks to Paul for this article on French bees and M&Ms:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-19835847

Food – a new Oxfam report on how the world is underestimating the likely impact of extreme weather on food prices. Prepare by growing your own and buying local organic:

http://www.oxfam.org/en/grow/policy/extreme-weather-extreme-prices

Methane – a less alarming view of what’s happening in the Arctic:

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/09/27/501221/arctic-methane-release-the-end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it/

Organics – this article from Fabian throws further doubt on the validity of the recent Stanford paper which claims little nutritional advantage in eating organic:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/09/17/organic-vs-conventional-food.aspx?e_cid=20120912_DNL_artTest_A6

Weather – thanks to Monika for this weather summary:

Due to the lack of passage of tropical cyclones and the prevalence of continental air masses part of the month, September 2012 in Hong Kong was drier than usual.  The monthly total rainfall was 213.0 millimetres, about 35 percent below the normal figure of 327.6 millimetres.  The accumulated rainfall since 1 January was 1758.4 millimetres, a deficit of 21 percent comparing to the normal figure of 2233.1 millimetres for the same period.  The month was also warmer and sunnier than usual.  The mean temperature of the month was 28.0 degrees, 0.3 degrees above the normal figure of 27.7 degrees.  The monthly total duration of bright sunshine of 187.4 hours was about 9 percent above normal.  

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About transitionsl

I've been an English teacher for the best part of 30 years, teaching in England, Tanzania, Brunei, Australia and Hong Kong. I've always been interested in nature and environmental issues, but it was the discovery of Peak Oil about five years ago that galvanised me into trying to help my local community to prepare for what will be a dramatically different world to the one many of us have been used to. I've been helping to run a transition group, following the guidelines created by Rob Hopkins's Transition Movement in the UK. This blog is an attempt to engage in discussion with a wider group of people in Hong Kong on the ways to transition from our current oil dependency to a state of fossil-free local resilience.
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